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Ukraine Post War: Victor & Natalia’s Story

“I truly feel that I am a part of the Body of Christ. And I know people are praying for me, not just here, but people in America, Germany, Russia. It’s like the Scripture says, how the entire body suffers when one member suffers.

Voice of the Persecuted is working to encourage and support our brothers and sisters suffering in extreme persecution. Too often, they’re  overlooked by governments and the global community at large. Yet, the modern-day persecution of Christians is one of the worst humanitarian crises in the world, today. Let us step up and in to help  care for our own. If we don’t, who will?

We need your partnership to continue the mission. Go with us through your gifts!

Together with your generous help, we can reach the goal to alleviate horrific suffering. In darkness and desperation, let us serve in love, with open arms and giving hands to provide light and hope.

HELP SAVE THE PERSECUTED

Every day, we thank God that He is working through you to care for His children and to further His Kingdom! As you greatly bless others, may God continue to bless you. Thank you so much for your support. We couldn’t do it without you!
You may also send your gift to:

2740 Third St
P.O. Box 122
Trenton, MI. 48183

IRAN | Pastor Nadarkhani Released; Three Church Members Held

Nadarkhani-Iran

Pastor Yousef Nardarkhani

Iran has released a Pastor Yousef Narkdarkhani and his wife several hours after they were arrested. Three other Christians are still in custody.

According to Christian Solidarity Worldwide’s sources, Pastor Nadarkhani and his wife, who were arrested after VEVAK officers raided their home in Rasht on May 13, were released the same day.

The raid on the Nadarkhani home was reportedly part of a series that targeted approximately 10 Christian homes.

Three other Christians, who were also arrested May 13, are still in custody. CSW was informed that Yasser Mossayebzadeh was arrested during the raid on Pastor Nadarkhani’s house. VEVAK officers summoned Saheb Fadaie and Mohammadreza Omidi (Youhan) to their offices by telephone prior to raiding their homes and reportedly seized their bibles, computers and mobile phones.

It’s not the first time the three men have been arrested. In February 2015, they were briefly detained following similar raids. Mohammedreza Omidi was initially detained in December 2012 during the annual crackdown on churches. In 2013, he was one of four Christians sentenced to 80 lashes each after they were charged with drinking alcohol during a communion service and possessing a receiver and satellite antenna.

This was also the second time Pastor Nadarkhani has been re-arrested since his release from prison in September 2012. He was initially arrested in 2009 after going to his children’s school to question the Muslim monopoly on religious education, which he felt was unconstitutional. He was charged with apostasy and sentenced to death in 2010, a decision that was upheld by the Supreme Court in 2011. On Sept. 8, 2012, he was released from prison following his acquittal on apostasy charges but was found guilty on charges of evangelizing. The pastor was recalled to prison Dec. 25, 2012 to complete the remainder of his three-year sentence and was again released on Dec. 7, 2013.

CSW’s Chief Executive Mervyn Thomas said, “While CSW is relieved that Pastor and Mrs. Nadarkhani have been freed, we remain deeply concerned for the welfare of Yasser Mossayebzadeh, Saheb Fadaie and Mohammadreza Omidi, who are still being held. The government must be held to account for its harassment of Iran’s Christian community, in particular the constant raids on homes and repeated arrests which are without basis. We continue to call on Iran to fully respect its constitutional and international human rights obligations by ensuring that justice and equality before the law are guaranteed to all citizens, regardless of their religion or belief.”

BREAKING: Iranian Pastor Yousef Nadarkhani Rearrested

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Yousef Nadarkhani with his wife, Tina Pasandide Nadarkhani

Tehran (Agenzia Fides) – Christian Pastor Yousef Nadarkhani, of the Protestant community “Church of Iran”, acquitted in 2012 of the charge of apostasy, was arrested yesterday, May 13, in Iran with his wife, Tina Pasandide Nadarkhani, and a faithful of his community, Yasser Mosayebzadeh, for reasons still unknown. As reported to Fides by the NGO “Christian Solidarity Worldwide” (CSW), which monitors the situation of Christians in Iran, Pastor Nadarkhani was arrested in the past and released from prison in September 2012.

Pastor Nadarkhani was arrested in 2009 after having questioned the Muslim monopoly of education in schools, which he called “unconstitutional”. He was charged with apostasy and sentenced to death in 2010, a decision upheld by the Supreme Court in 2011. He was repeatedly asked to renounce his faith during the trial, to avoid the death penalty, but he refused. On September 8, 2012 he was released after acquittal of apostasy, although he had been found guilty of “evangelizing Muslims”, and sentenced for this to three years in prison.

After Pastor Nadarkhani’s release, even his lawyer, Mohammed Ali Dadkhah, a prominent lawyer and human rights defender, was jailed for ten years and disbarred in September 2012 for “actions and propaganda against the Islamic regime”.
In the note sent to Fides, CSW expressed “deep concern for the Pastor” and calls for “clarification on the reasons for his arrest” and asks the institutions to “fully respect the constitutional and international human rights obligations, ensuring justice and equality before the law for all citizens, regardless of their beliefs”. (PA) (Agenzia Fides 14/05/2016)

SEE UPDATE 5/16/2016

Investigating The Invisibles: Pakistsani Christian Asylum Seekers In Thailand

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(Voice of the Persecuted) Based on the abuse Pakistani Christians face, it’s striking to our group how often they’re overlooked and ignored. We at VOP often call them, “the invisibles”. After speaking with many Christians from Pakistan and those frozen in time in Thailand, and Malaysia, we found some very interesting facts. While it’s impossible to obtain numbers to prove there is a clear bias from the UNHCR in these countries in regard to Christians, what we did found was mind-boggling.  At the time of this posting, we are still waiting on the UNHCR Bangkok office to send the statistics.  When the information is received, we’ll give you an update. (UPDATE Aug. 1, 2016—We have yet to receive the statistics from the Bangkok UNHCR office. Sadly, this doesn’t surprise us.)

The UNHCR office in Thailand recently demanded all Christian Asylum seekers report for a new identity card.  They quickly told them this was not a work permit, and would not offer anything more than identification.  But unfortunately, the Thai Government is not recognizing this ID nor, as in the past, their asylum status documents.

Some say there is an attitude of bias toward Pakistani Christians in Thailand.  Other reports suggest that there is a hatred for all Pakistani’s in Thailand.  They are viewed as possible terrorists.

Christians in Pakistan are persecuted severely.  On the exterior, Pakistan is a democracy but the Mullahs rule with a strict form of Sharia law.  The most recent evidence is the 16-year-old girl who was drugged, strangled, then tied to a van and set on fire. Why? She simply helped her friend who wanted to elope.  In another case, a 2-year-old baby was killed because his father was a lowly Christian. The father was contracted to paint the home of a Muslim. When the homeowner didn’t want to pay the agreed price, he took others and shot up the Christian painter’s home, they killed the baby.

Then there is the terrifying murder of a Christian Couple that was burned alive at the brick kiln where they were bonded laborers. Their accusers are free under a loophole in Sharia law.  Basically, there is no justice for persecutors of Christians in Pakistan. In recent news, a Rights Activist that was gunned down because he dared to voice the truth about extremism in the Pakistani Government—an act that happens too frequently.  Story after story emerges of persecution and those who flee the hatred and violence, false blasphemy charges brought against them, a law this being misused against minorities, the violent fatwa’s issued against them, the physical attacks and assassination attempts all due to their faith. In some cases of families in hiding, we are aware of the women wearing Burkas to hide their identity.   It goes on and on.

Invisible as they are frozen in countries who refuse to recognize the UNHCR refugee program nor the asylum certificate given to them when their case is filed. There are no programs of protection set up for them, such as Thailand.  With visas expired, these asylum seekers are arrested and detained in deplorable conditions.  Live in fear and hiding, with their children often malnourished and sick. World Watch Monitor reports the water in Thailand is unclean and a breeding ground for disease. Christians can’t freely move or legally work, bottled water is not an option.

Pakistani Christians face horrific conditions which they are forced to endure in Thailand.  The country is not a signature of the 1951 Convention relating to the Status of Refugees. The UNHCR undertakes refugee status determination (RSD) for asylum seekers in the absence of a government mechanism and recognizes some as refugees, but has no authority to grant asylum. The asylum seekers are unable to legally work or provide for their basic needs without outside support. The situation remains as critical.

Some have claimed their testimonies were not fairly translated during asylum interviews. Translators are not 100% versed in Urdu, which causes a huge problem for the Pakistani Christians. Their details are not always accurate, or lost in the translation.  Their cases are subject to denial.

In a report from the Bangkok Post, an official with the UNHCR is pushing for preference to the Rohingya Muslims in Myanmar. They’re in camps on the border of Thailand.  But no mention of the 10,000 Christians languishing in Thailand.

Christian refugees are ignored and placed under and invisible cloak.  They are fearful to talk about it.  If they do, the government begins a backlash with arrests.

Thailand is embroiled with it’s own political battle and has begun punishing those who speak out against the new Junta.  A report yesterday said that the UN was inquiring into the human rights abuse practices of punishing those speaking on social media. The report was titled “Thailand Faces Moment of  Shame at U.N. Rights Council Meeting.”  The UNHCR seems helpless and some say are purposely ignoring the plight of the Christian Minority in favor of the Muslim population.  Some claim it would be discriminating to give an exception for persecuted Christians.  But they’re running out of safe places, even re-persecuted in refugee centers in Europe.

We find the Muslim population in the U.S. and elsewhere take care of their own often pooling their finances to support asylum fees even for those they may not be related to.  In heavy Muslim populated areas in the US, they build houses, provide jobs, and other needs for fellow Muslims.  Yet, we find the Western Church ignores our suffering brothers and sisters in Christ. Some churches do all they can, but their numbers are low. In Thailand, very few churches offer help, but burdened by the large numbers of Christian asylees. These asylum seekers must depend on the generosity of strangers, NGO’s and churches to reach out.

We in the West can and should do more for these precious brethren.  Can your church sponsor a family, or support their monthly needs? The cost ranges between $250-$300.00 per month depending on the size of the family. Even one month would be a great help. Voice of the Persecuted is on the ground in Thailand and the number of vetted cases on waiting list is long. Medical expenses are also a greatly needed.  As many of the children suffer from malnutrition, skin infections and other illnesses.  Any amount helps.  No matter how small, it truly makes a difference.  Can you help us keep working in Thailand to comfort and cover more families?

Let’s take care of our own.

Together with your generous help, we can reach the goal to alleviate horrific suffering. In darkness and desperation, let us serve in love, with open arms and giving hands to provide light and hope.

HELP SAVE THE PERSECUTED

Every day, we thank God that He is working through you to care for His children and to further His Kingdom! As you greatly bless others, may God continue to bless you. Thank you so much for your support. We couldn’t do it without you!
You may also send your gift to:

2740 Third St
P.O. Box 122
Trenton, MI. 48183

 

EUROPE: Report claims one in eight Christian refugees are attacked for their faith

 

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We have been warning of the persecution Christians are facing in refugee centers in Europe, Markus Rode head of Open Doors Germany said, the figures show “fear and panic” among Christians migrants.

Christian refugees have fled refugees centers after extreme intimidation and at times physical violence by Muslim refugees.

“Discrimination and violence against people of different beliefs exist in refugee centres much more extensively than authorities want to believe,” Rode said. “Converts are most exposed. They are seen as traitors by radical Muslims.”

231 Christian migrants residing in Germany were interviewed. The majority being  from Iraq, Afghanistan and Syria. 42 percent have reported insults, 37 percent said they suffered a physical injury, and 32 percent allegedly received death threats.

According to the survey, 88% said they’ve been targeted by other migrants because of their religion.Nearly half surveyed accused guards of discriminating against religious minorities or harassing them. In Germany’s refugee housing, both the migrants and the security are mostly Muslim.

The L’OBSERVATOIRE DE LA CHRISTIANOPHOBIE reported Cardinal Rainer Woelki said at an ecumenical meeting in Düsseldorf Saturday 13 February, “The fear increases that politicians and the authorities do not take seriously enough such threats [against Christians in refugee centers]. The persecution of Christians is not a thing of past ages.”  He demanded that Germany defend greater religious freedom. For his part, Pastor Gottfried Martens said the “harassment” against the Christian migrants in refugee centers in Germany has increased. He affirmed that Christians were forced to watch beheading videos, were banned from the common kitchen because  they were”unclean”, beaten and Christian necklaces torn from their necks. The pastor suggested Christians and Muslims needed to be housed in separate shelters. “When I talk to politicians, they tell me that the churches do not consider that necessary accommodations are separated and I look ridiculous (…) Our efforts to be tolerant, which is in itself praiseworthy, are not so far allow us to let Christians become a kind of guinea pigs. ”

World Watch Monitor reported Christians among the thousands of Middle Eastern migrants who have fled to Europe have discovered that a familiar burden has followed them: religious harassment.

Voice of the Persecuted shared last August how Christian refugees moved from asylum accommodation after threats by Islamists in Sweden. The Christians feared for their safety after it was demanded that they stop wearing Christian symbols, like crosses around their necks. And that they were not welcome in common areas when the aggressive Muslim group was there. After receiving no help when the atmosphere became intimidating, the Christian refugees dared not stay and decided it would be safer to find other accommodations.

Many Christians have left their homelands fleeing persecution and discrimination. They are already traumatized by their experiences. Imagine what it’s like to realize you will suffer the same discrimination and hate in a place of refuge.

Discrimination follows Christians not only from the Middle East, but those from Asia. Pakistani Christians seeking asylum in Thailand are living through extreme hardships in the UNHCR process which takes years, painstakingly long. Unable to legally work, send their children to school, constant fear of arrest and without a program to aid their basic survival and medical needs. They are trapped in a system that often fails them. Remember the horrific atrocities Nigerian Christians are facing. A staggering amount of Nigerian Christians suffer as internal refugees. They too face extreme discrimination from Muslims in the camps.  Let us shine as the Body of Christ and do more for them. Please consider partnering with us to care for those detained with their children in Immigration Detention Center and in refugee camps. To support those without means to care for their families. To give hope that they have not been forgotten by their brothers and sisters in Christ.

Together with your generous help, we can reach the goal to alleviate horrific suffering. In darkness and desperation, let us serve in love, with open arms and giving hands to provide light and hope.

HELP SAVE THE PERSECUTED

Every day, we thank God that He is working through you to care for His children and to further His Kingdom! As you greatly bless others, may God continue to bless you. Thank you so much for your support. We couldn’t do it without you!
You may also send your gift to:

2740 Third St
P.O. Box 122
Trenton, MI. 48183

 

European Parliament debates Nigeria and Boko Haram

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Rev. George Odafe. African Diaspora for Freedom of Religion

(World Watch Monitor) A conference on religious radicalisation, Boko Haram and terrorism in Nigeria was held by the largest group in the European Parliament last week.

The European People’s Party Working Group on Inter-religious Dialogue’s conference on 3 May had two sessions: the first on the broader situation of Nigeria and the other on the threats and needs for peace and security in the region.

German MEP Joachim Zeller, who hosted the conference, said that even though the “Nigerian election and peaceful transition of power was a major achievement”, there is still a major threat in the north, where Christians and other minorities are being persecuted.

Each session had a panel with interventions of advocacy and civil society groups and experts on Boko Haram and Nigeria, including Esther Kattenberg, Advocacy Officer for Open Doors International (ODI), which partners with churches in Nigeria. She explained that the reports that appear in the media are “only the tip of the iceberg”, as “many violations go unreported”.

“It’s important to remark that not only Christians are suffering,” said Jane Ura, co-ordinator of the Africa Diaspora for Freedom of Religion, introducing the first panel. “There are also challenges for people with indigenous beliefs, and Muslims.”

Origins of violence

Professor Yusuf Turaki, chair of the Christian Association of Nigeria’s editorial committee for its recent declaration, ‘Nigeria Renew’, said most violence in Nigeria is “rooted in the British colonial social-economic structure”, as well as the lack of will of Nigeria’s political elite to change it and to “build an integrative society”. He said the British administration used conscripted soldiers from the two Islamic empires in the north to defeat the rest of the ethnic groups in the south.

Later, the number of Christians in northern Nigeria, where the former Islamic states existed, increased from 0 to 31%. He said the conflict is religious and economic.

“Boko Haram acts in a similar way to the Kanem-Bornu Empire of 1900,” Turaki said. “Their descendants are still the rulers of the area.”

Arne Mulders, ODI’s Research and Communications Manager for West and Central Africa and author of the report, ‘Crushed but not defeated, the impact of persistent violence on the Church in northern Nigeria’, said Nigeria suffered from the “religion and politics of a dominant class which wants to stay in power”.

Nigeria is complex because there are several perpetrators that use organised violence and are interlinked. Some conflicts are over land issues, but there is also a religious factor.

“There are ethno-politic and economic reasons, but the common denominator is religious,” said Mulders.

Nigerian pastor George Odafe talked about the links between Boko Haram and Fulani herdsmen, who attack farmers in the Middle Belt of Nigeria. He also warned about the dangers of famine and economic losses on exports, saying Fulani herdsmen are constantly destroying crops.

Recommendations

The ODI speakers presented their report on Nigeria, with a series of recommendations for the EU to put “pressure on Nigeria for equality before the law and to bring perpetrators to justice”.

The EU is a major donor to Nigeria, but “people are missing out on aid”, said ODI’s Kattenberg.

“Nigeria is an easy partner,” said Marcela Szymanski from Aid to the Church in Need, suggesting that although the government is not perpetrating the violent acts, it is doing little to prevent them. Therefore, Szymanski suggested, the EU “should rather give the money to civil society, which is acting on the ground”.

Mark Barkwick, from Human Rights Without Frontiers, talked about long-term solutions focusing on the factors that bring religious extremism, such as structural grievances.

“We need a strategy for counter-narratives, and the authorities should create political dialogue with certain factions of Boko Haram,” he said. “We are often too focused on security campaigns, but they often end up in abuses.”

Rev. Odafe, who works in the Archdiocese of Kaduna in northern Nigeria, said “pro-activity is needed”, especially when dealing with victims. “The average Nigerian comes for counselling to the pastor, but we are not psychologists,” he said.

He shared his personal testimony of running from a group of teenagers with machetes and hiding in a house in ruins. He said he saw the young men stopping a pregnant woman coming back from the market, ripping her womb open, taking out the foetus and placing it into her hands.

“I fainted,” he said, “and this is the kind of violence we have every day, even from teenagers.”

Temitope Olodo, an anti-terrorism expert, said many children want to join Boko Haram because “they are strong”, while “most of the jobless join terrorist groups”.

Voice of the Persecuted has confirmed with those on the ground that attacks are taking places every other day. The safety of those being asked to return to their villages is of great concern. Many of those Voice of the Persecuted are supporting are from areas still at great risk of attack. The crisis is far from over and will take time and help to get them back on their feet. Ther is also worry that Christian villages will be pushed to the back burner for government help. That Christian schools and churches will also not be considered. If the Nigerian Church in the North is to survive, we will need to come alongside them with support, much like the first century Christians did to survive. Are we up for the task? Yes! Let the world know us by our love for one another.

Project 133 Nigeria mission meeting Mar 2016

Discussing the ongoing suffering and discrimination of Christians in North Nigeria (Voice of the Persecuted Project 13:3 Nigeria Mission Meeting)

Read how Nigerian Christians are overcoming fear through faith in Christ and our recent mission meeting with one of our project leaders in Nigeria.

Voice of the Persecuted has been asked to expand the mission to aid 2 more camps—2000 in one, 7000 in the other. We humbly ask for and need your support to help alleviate their suffering. We pray God can use each one of us to do our part for His love to shine on these persecuted brothers and sisters in Nigeria. Any amount is greatly appreciated. If your church is being led to do more for our persecuted family, please contact us. We would be happy to send detailed updates of this relief project. Is God calling you to be a part of this important mission?

We are committed to being a VOICE for persecuted Nigerian Christians and bring them comfort, relief, and encouragement. We have committed to a long-term mission in Nigeria. When they are able to return home. we will be there to help rebuild villages and their lives. They will not be forgotten!

Christian Children Nigeria copyright photo Voice of the Persecuted©-1

Chidren existing in North Nigerian IDP (internal refugees) camp

We want you to know that even in great hardship, they thank God and feel extremely blessed that He has kept His hand on orphan-306x4601them. They have been so encouraged and thank God for each one of you who have joined this mission through prayer and your support.

Together with your generous help, we can reach the goal to alleviate horrific suffering. In darkness and desperation, let us serve in love, with open arms and giving hands to provide light and hope.

HELP SAVE THE PERSECUTED

HELP SAVE THE PERSECUTED

Every day, we thank God that He is working through you to care for His children and to further His Kingdom! As you greatly bless others, may God continue to bless you. Thank you so much for your support. We couldn’t do it without you!
You may also send your gift to:

2740 Third St
P.O. Box 122
Trenton, MI. 48183

If the Lord is placing it on your heart and you are able, please help us to continue the mission in Nigeria. It will be a long term project. Donations always desperately needed

Pakistani Christians Trapped Under Inhumane Conditions – Where is the Church?

Pakistani Christian asylum seekers held in detention center like cattle. Photo: BPCA

Pakistani Christian asylum seekers held in detention center like cattle. 

Voice of the Persecuted is not only helping in Nigeria but still working diligently for the Pakistani Christians suffering in Thailand. They need our prayers and they need our help. If you, your church or ministry group would like to sponsor a family in need or to offer a one-time gift, Voice of the Persecuted will be sure these persecuted ones are comforted by your generosity. These families spend most of their time in hiding and constant fear of arrest. They’re in desperate need of rent, food and medicine as many are suffering from ongoing illnesses, skin infections and disease. The children are too often malnourished. There are approximately 10,000 Pakistani Christians stuck in this crisis that can take 6 or more years. Their children are not allowed to attend school. What will become of their future?

Child suffering from lack of medical treatment. Photo: Voice of the Persecuted

Child suffering from lack of medical treatment. Photo: Voice of the Persecuted

Another danger in places like Thailand is sex trafficking. Thailand is known throughout the world for this booming industry. Many asylum seekers fear for their young daughters, that they may be abducted then sold. Knowing how vulnerable they are, many girls are constantly approached by traffickers trying to lure them in. A few weakened by desperation have fallen for their trap. Some will tell you, “I had no other choice.” How sad it is to lose even one sister to this life of abuse, simply because she could find no compassion from others.

Asylum seekers cannot legally work in Thailand to care for their families and are often arrested when caught working illegally. This puts a huge strain on the mother trying to care for her littles ones with no support. They are at great risk of being exploited. Raids are regularly held by Thai authorities in slum areas known to house these asylum seekers. At times, whole families have been detained in the Immigration Detention Center though they hold asylum seeker certificates from UNHCR. You would think this document could protect them, but not in Thailand. It’s a devastating and inhumane situation for them.  You see, they’re frequently held in overcrowded cells with one filthy toilet, and only served a soupy mix of water, cucumbers, and rice. The fee to bail them out is extremely high, 50,000 Thai Baht (approx. $1500 USD). Frequently they, particularly men, are held without bail for extended periods of time, even months.

Project 13:3 Thailand: VOP Thailand Representative delivering food to the IDC

Project 13:3 Thailand: VOP food delivery to the IDC

We have been blessed with the ability to get food, baby formula and toiletries to those suffering in the IDC. Thank You to those who are helping to support that program of our Thailand mission. We were able to get a delivery of formula to the babies this month!  But the need is so great for the whole of Pakistani Christians fleeing persecution in Pakistan; then forced to endure the drawn out process of asylum in the unwelcoming nation of Thailand. Pray for them, pray for God to meet their needs, to give them hope and strength. And ask our LORD to send caring hands to help them.

But the need is so great for the whole of Pakistani Christians fleeing persecution in Pakistan, then forced to endure the drawn out process of asylum in the unwelcoming nation of Thailand. No human being should have to endure these conditions. The program is failing them and so are we when we ignore the cries of our brothers and sisters.  With all the churches in America alone, why do these brothers and sisters suffer? Surely we could be doing much more to help alleviate their misery. Pray for them, pray for their needs to be met and to give them hope and strength to endure. Ask the LORD to send caring hands to help them.

Pakistani Christian asylum seekers brought to court caged in police van

Pakistani Christian asylum seekers brought to court caged in police van, children included.

Voice of the Persecuted helps pay monthly living/medical expenses for families suffering the greatest need. More cases are continually brought before us, but it’s heartbreaking we are unable to help them all. With your love and support, we’re praying that many more of our brothers and sisters covered and comforted by the Body of Christ, us! But we can only do this with your help.

If you are feeling led to bring hope to Christians suffering in Thailand please consider the following:

  • Cover the monthly living expenses for a family in great need. (approx $250+/- based on family size)
  • Provide bail to protect a persecuted believer from rearrest for two years. ($1500 based on exchange rate)
  • Food deliveries for the nutritional needs of those detained in the IDC. ($50 provides 2 meals a day for 4 people weekly – personal hygienic products such as soap, toothbrushes and paste are also much-needed items.)
  • Donations of any amount are always needed and greatly appreciated.

Voice of the Persecuted is on the ground in Thailand. Come with us on the mission through your gifts!

Together with your generous help, we can reach the goal to alleviate horrific suffering. In darkness and desperation, let us serve in love, with open arms and giving hands to provide light and hope.

HELP SAVE THE PERSECUTED

Every day, we thank God that He is working through you to care for His children and to further His Kingdom! As you greatly bless others, may God continue to bless you. Thank you so much for your support. We couldn’t do it without you!
You may also send your gift to:

2740 Third St
P.O. Box 122
Trenton, MI. 48183

Voice of the Persecuted - Project 13:3 Aid Mission

Voice of the Persecuted – Project 13:3 Aid Mission

 

HEBREW – God Full of Mercy / El Maleh Rachamim by Sarah Liberman

A modern-day Hebrew psalm by Israeli worship leader Sarah Liberman from the album “I am Before You”.


 

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